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5 Differences Between Commercial and Personal Lines Insurance

As we all know, in the past, everyone had a local agent who they consulted at renewal, brought payments to, and even visited when they had a claim. Now, many people receive paperless renewals, have their payments automatically drafted, and call an 800 number to report a claim. Many people are purchasing their auto or property policies online or through an 800 number or a website, but the industry hasn’t progressed to offering these options for all but the most simple business risks.

Businesses value the service agents provide and are actively looking for agents who will provide knowledge and direction in protecting one of their biggest assets.  If you have not spoken with your agent to evaluate your business' changing needs, you should.  You can contact us by clicking here or calling 239-542-7101.



1. Named Insureds:

On a personal lines policy, the Named Insured will be an individual or a married couple. For the business policy, there are a variety of entity types (sole proprietor, partnership, limited liability corporation, corporation, etc.) that could be listed as the Named Insured. Depending on the ownership structure, there may be multiple Named Insureds on a single policy. Understanding how different entities are set up is key to understanding who the policy is protecting and how protect the account.

2. Property Concerns:

When writing property coverage for personal lines consumers, agents are typically looking to cover homes and their contents. Property coverage for commercial consumers can cover a myriad of different building types – offices, storefronts, warehouses, etc. Contents coverage may cover any number of items, such as inventory, furniture, property of the business’ customers, and/or machinery.

3. Liability Concerns:

Commercial consumers will have broader concerns than personal lines consumers. Underwriters will consider four different liability exposures: premises, operations, products, and completed operations, while personal lines consumers primarily have only a premises exposure. Briefly, premises exposure is the potential that a claim could arise solely due to the condition of the property in which the business operates, operations exposure is the potential that a claim could arise in the process of the work the insured performs, products exposure is the potential that a claim could arise due to the products that the insured sells, and completed operations exposure is the potential that a claim could arise due to the work the insured performs after it is completed. Because businesses can have unique operations, it is important to understand which type of liability poses the most risk and would likely lead to a greater chance of claims.

4. Auto Insurance Concerns:

Businesses have many different needs when it comes to auto insurance. It is essential to understand who the drivers are and what the vehicles are used for. While these same principles apply when writing personal lines insurance, the variance in vehicles and uses are much greater on an auto insurance policy. Further, there are often additional regulations that apply to commercial risks. Drivers may be required to have special driver’s licenses depending on the size of the vehicles, and hauling certain commodities will require financial filings that will be new to the personal lines agent.

5. Policy Forms:

Finally, one of the reasons that personal lines insurance has become so commoditized, other than the similarities between the insureds, is the similarities between different insurer’s forms. Commercial policy and endorsement forms can vary drastically from one carrier to another, and in many cases, insurers will manuscript endorsements to create coverage specific to an individual insured’s needs. Agents will need to understand the advantages that the forms they are selling offer to the insured. Independent agents, in particular, ought to familiarize themselves with the differences between the carriers that they write for and be cognizant of which company would be the best fit for each account in regards to coverage.



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